The Same Old Game (Volumes 1 and 2) Mike Roberts

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Published: November 26th 2011

Kindle Edition

1006 pages


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The Same Old Game (Volumes 1 and 2)  by  Mike Roberts

The Same Old Game (Volumes 1 and 2) by Mike Roberts
November 26th 2011 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, ZIP | 1006 pages | ISBN: | 8.26 Mb

Enjoy both Volume One and Two of the amazing story of football’s origins in this special 800-page compendium edition for Kindle users.Where did football begin? Thats one question Mike Roberts fails to answer, coming to the conclusion that itsMoreEnjoy both Volume One and Two of the amazing story of football’s origins in this special 800-page compendium edition for Kindle users.Where did football begin? Thats one question Mike Roberts fails to answer, coming to the conclusion that its rather like asking when and where dogs first learned to fetch sticks.But the story of the ancient games that may or may not have had something to do with the modern codes is a fascinating one, and this book explores each of them in detail, drawing on the very latest research while re-examining the original sources to dispel a number of misconceptions and presenting plenty of surprises along the way!From William Web Ellis picking up a soccer ball and single handedly inventing the game of rugby to Melbournian settlers adapting Gaelic football to an Aboriginal game called marngrook it can be hard to separate myth from reality.

Which is precisely what this book hopes to do.The true story of footballs ancient origins looks not at what we think we know, but what we know we know. Could football really have started as a fertility rite or with ancient head kicking cults? What is the real story behind the games played by pre-Columbian Americans, Aboriginal Australasians, the Ancient Chinese, the Romans, the Vikings, the Celts and many other cultures? And how much did they really have to do with the way football is played today?Sport and history combine to tell an intriguing story as we explore the medieval folk games, the school traditions and the earliest clubs that played football long before it was ever standardised into the modern forms of soccer, rugby union, rugby league, and Gaelic, Australian, American and Canadian football.Although the Football Association was founded in 1863 to draw up simple rules for a game to unite the football community, a unified code was never to be.

In the second of two volumes on the origins of football, Mike Roberts tells the story of how and why so many different versions of the same game came into existence.For a start, in Melbourne, Australia, the local footballers had already agreed to their own rules before the FA was even formed, and the game they created is still played today - arguably the oldest and most authentic member of the football family.Back in Britain, the clubs that preferred a more physical game in which the ball could be carried were not convinced by FAs kicking game. Instead, they formed their own association and developed the rival code of rugby.

And there was yet more division to come with the infamous schism between rugby union and what became rugby league.But neither soccer nor rugby were always welcomed in Ireland, which was fighting to preserve its own separate identity. In defiance against these foreign games, the Gaelic Athletic Association was founded and devised its own set of rules.The story also takes us to North America, and shows how and why rugby was adopted in the United States but was soon changed into the different sport of American football.

And not forgetting Canada, whose own game developed in a similar fashion to the American one, but never quite entirely.Each of these sports have built up their own histories and traditions. But although these are now usually told separately, by treating them all as The Same Old Game, Mike Roberts reveals how each of the codes share a common ancestry.



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